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View Full Version : How can I get a Russian passport and become a citizen?


Pyotr
19-05-2007, 23:02:32
I was just wondering how to go about getting a Russian passport. I've been here studying and working for ten years and am eligible for dual citizenship.

I thought that becoming a local would make working here a bit easier and possibly simplify things like buying a flat. As it is, I'm here on a business visa, and as an application for these can be refused at will, I've always been put off the idea of buying real estate.

The weather and Moscow's easy-going lifestyle have also grown on me, and I'm finding it difficult to think of going back home.

Does anyone here have any experience or ideas of how getting citizenship works under current laws?

I know I could do it very quickly with a "fiktivny brak", but the idea of being married, even for a short time, doesn't appeal to me.

Any input would be much appreciated.

Cheers,

P

Nitka
20-05-2007, 08:48:48
As far as I understand, one should have been here several years with staying permission, not with visa, to get the citizenship, or atleast to be able to apply for it.

Peasant
20-05-2007, 10:11:11
I have heard it depends on the county of origin. If you are from the CIS, it is a bit simpler. I have heard that a marriage would do it.

It used to be that, up until 2002, marriage to a Russian meant instant citizenship. This happened to an American professor I know.

To the best of my knowledge, keeping in mind that there were massive changes to immigration laws on January 15th of this year…

The first step is getting a “veed na zhetelstvo.” I have heard it is a nightmare, but it is good for three years. After that, you can make it a “permanent” residency permit, which lasts, I think, from 7-10 years. After a year of living in Russian with this permit, you can apply for the passport.

You might want to check with your country of origin, i.e. call their embassy. I know that it is possible to lose one’s American citizenship, in theory, by being naturalized in another country. I am not sure if the US State Department pursue this too rigorously and I have yet to hear of an example. I think the UK tries to discourage its citizens from being naturalized in other countries as well.


One word of caution- if you enter Russian with your Russian passport, in the eyes of the law, you are a Russian citizen. Do not expect protection from your other country of citizenship if you entered Russia with a Russian passport.

Filimon
20-05-2007, 11:33:50
I have heard it depends on the county of origin. If you are from the CIS, it is a bit simpler. I have heard that a marriage would do it.

It used to be that, up until 2002, marriage to a Russian meant instant citizenship. This happened to an American professor I know.

To the best of my knowledge, keeping in mind that there were massive changes to immigration laws on January 15th of this year…

The first step is getting a “veed na zhetelstvo.” I have heard it is a nightmare, but it is good for three years. After that, you can make it a “permanent” residency permit, which lasts, I think, from 7-10 years. After a year of living in Russian with this permit, you can apply for the passport.

You might want to check with your country of origin, i.e. call their embassy. I know that it is possible to lose one’s American citizenship, in theory, by being naturalized in another country. I am not sure if the US State Department pursue this too rigorously and I have yet to hear of an example. I think the UK tries to discourage its citizens from being naturalized in other countries as well.


One word of caution- if you enter Russian with your Russian passport, in the eyes of the law, you are a Russian citizen. Do not expect protection from your other country of citizenship if you entered Russia with a Russian passport.

Isn't it the case that in order to get Russian citizenship you must give up your current one?

Potato Junkie
21-05-2007, 08:35:30
I know I could do it very quickly with a "fiktivny brak", but the idea of being married, even for a short time, doesn't appeal to me.


That route is no longer quick; neither is it easy; think 2-3 years of bureaucratic hoop jumping.

Pyotr
22-05-2007, 10:50:54
I have heard it depends on the county of origin. If you are from the CIS, it is a bit simpler. I have heard that a marriage would do it.

It used to be that, up until 2002, marriage to a Russian meant instant citizenship. This happened to an American professor I know.

To the best of my knowledge, keeping in mind that there were massive changes to immigration laws on January 15th of this year…

The first step is getting a “veed na zhetelstvo.” I have heard it is a nightmare, but it is good for three years. After that, you can make it a “permanent” residency permit, which lasts, I think, from 7-10 years. After a year of living in Russian with this permit, you can apply for the passport.

You might want to check with your country of origin, i.e. call their embassy. I know that it is possible to lose one’s American citizenship, in theory, by being naturalized in another country. I am not sure if the US State Department pursue this too rigorously and I have yet to hear of an example. I think the UK tries to discourage its citizens from being naturalized in other countries as well.


One word of caution- if you enter Russian with your Russian passport, in the eyes of the law, you are a Russian citizen. Do not expect protection from your other country of citizenship if you entered Russia with a Russian passport.

Thanks for the information. When you say that these permits "last" for a certain period of time, does that mean you have to wait out that whole stretch, or is there a lower time limit for going on to the next stage?

Also, as far as losing original citizenship, my country, Australia, changed its laws to allow a much broader choice of dual citizenships specifically to facilitate doing business with other countries.

Goog to be reminded that if I enter Russia as a Russian, my other identity becomes useless.

Need to think this through...

exprumos
22-05-2007, 11:08:06
Thanks for the information. When you say that these permits "last" for a certain period of time, does that mean you have to wait out that whole stretch, or is there a lower time limit for going on to the next stage?

Also, as far as losing original citizenship, my country, Australia, changed its laws to allow a much broader choice of dual citizenships specifically to facilitate doing business with other countries.

Goog to be reminded that if I enter Russia as a Russian, my other identity becomes useless.

Need to think this through...


Australia will allow you dual citizenship - Russia will not.
The rules now allow an individual born on the territory of the then USSR to hold dual nationality. All others must first refuse their original citizenship in order to apply for Russian.
That is in addition to whatever other barriers they may choose to put in your way.

M-C
22-05-2007, 13:11:22
I have heard it depends on the county of origin. If you are from the CIS, it is a bit simpler. I have heard that a marriage would do it.

It used to be that, up until 2002, marriage to a Russian meant instant citizenship. This happened to an American professor I know.

To the best of my knowledge, keeping in mind that there were massive changes to immigration laws on January 15th of this year…

The first step is getting a “veed na zhetelstvo.” I have heard it is a nightmare, but it is good for three years. After that, you can make it a “permanent” residency permit, which lasts, I think, from 7-10 years. After a year of living in Russian with this permit, you can apply for the passport.

You might want to check with your country of origin, i.e. call their embassy. I know that it is possible to lose one’s American citizenship, in theory, by being naturalized in another country. I am not sure if the US State Department pursue this too rigorously and I have yet to hear of an example. I think the UK tries to discourage its citizens from being naturalized in other countries as well.


One word of caution- if you enter Russian with your Russian passport, in the eyes of the law, you are a Russian citizen. Do not expect protection from your other country of citizenship if you entered Russia with a Russian passport.

Marriage never meant instant citizenship, it gave you the right to reside in Russia, with your spouse. If married, you can apply for citizenship which entails giving up your citizenship of origin. You probably could get it back in some countries (France for example), but in Russia, you will be Russian and Russian only. Not necessarily an advantage.

Filimon
22-05-2007, 13:18:48
Australia will allow you dual citizenship - Russia will not.
The rules now allow an individual born on the territory of the then USSR to hold dual nationality. All others must first refuse their original citizenship in order to apply for Russian.
That is in addition to whatever other barriers they may choose to put in your way.

Well, the rules have always been there, I believe Article 6 of the Citizenship Law of 2002 has not changed much. If, as a Russian, you acquire a citizenship of another state, that does not mean you lose Russian citizenship.

It is weird that it only works one way though, but not unusual to have to give up your previous citizenship (Denmark and Ukraine, inter alia, being other examples).

exprumos
22-05-2007, 14:21:01
Well, the rules have always been there, I believe Article 6 of the Citizenship Law of 2002 has not changed much. If, as a Russian, you acquire a citizenship of another state, that does not mean you lose Russian citizenship.

It is weird that it only works one way though, but not unusual to have to give up your previous citizenship (Denmark and Ukraine, inter alia, being other examples).


Agreed, my Russian wife was allowed to take up Irish citizenship and hold two passports, as were our kids.
On the other hand I am not entitled to Russian citizenship without giving up my Irish.
Not a big deal, as I cannot see any advantages to my being Russian.

exprumos
22-05-2007, 14:37:18
I asked someone from the Irish Embassy about this a number of years ago, and he told me a story that goes something like this:

At the turn of the century, the USA had a similar rule; that one had to rescind ones original citizenship in order to attain American citizenship.
You turned up at the embassy, handed in your passport, received a letter from the embassy explaining that you had rescinded your Irish citizenship....


....and then they just gave the passport back to you.